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Looking at locations with Alfred connections which are not featured on other pages (Alfred's South Marston and Alfred's Villages).
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A crossing on the River Ganges, where Alfred's battery was posted for approximately a month, from March 19, 1918. Alfred likened the heat there to the blast furnaces of the stamping shop, and spent almost his entire time there suffering from diarrhoea, dysentry and fever. Despite this, Alfred explored Cawnpore, and was especially captivated by local crafts.

By mid-April, Alfred was finding the heat so oppressive that he accepted an offer of a transfer to Ranikhet.

In August, he found himself back at Cawnpore, and was relieved to return to the hills again - this time back to Roorkee - in December 1918.

Cawnpore is the Anglicized name for what is known locally as Kanpur.

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Village near Hungerford, Berkshire, which was the birthplace and childhood home of Mary Williams (nee Peck), Alfred's wife, until she was about 11.

The couple were married at St Saviour's Church, Eddington, on October 21, 1903.

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The hill station to which Alfred was posted while on military service in India - and the name he gave to the cottage that he and Mary built on his return home, after the war.

Ranikhet is in the foothills of the Himalayas, snow-capped peaks are visible from there, even though some are 120 miles away.

Alfred was captivated by everything at Ranikhet, and especially the mountains. He wrote: "The hills open out into a great theatre... I should never dream of such a sight. It is simply amazing," and also: "The Himalayas are divine... What material I shall have for books - if I live... I would not have missed India for five years of life."

Alfred's stay at Ranikhet lasted from April 17, 1918 to August 11, 1918, and he never returned.

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The location of Alfred's first Indian posting in November 1917, and where he returned, in December 1918, following postings at Cawnpore and Ranikhet.

His first impressions were that it was (in Leonard Clark's words) "a place of noise and evil spells", but he was soon captivated by Roorkee and the rest of India.

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The Mechanics' Institute was a revolutionary organisation and venue that encouraged the education of railway workers in Swindon, and catered for many of their needs.

Founded in 18?? by the workers themselves but partly funded and supported by the Great Western Railway, the Mechanics' even, at one point in its existence, was involved in the provision of a market and bathing facilities. But it is best remembered for its extraordinary - especially for the time - efforts to provide opportunities for the men and their families to better themselves, culturally.

The Mechanics had an excellent library which included national newspapers and even a wire service, bringing instant news from around the world. Among the many different kinds of social events held there, it was most famed for the lectures that brought enlightenment to ordinary railway workers at a time when few of their contemporaries, employed in other fields, would have had no access to such opportunities.

Alfred first delivered a lecture there in late February, 1910.

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The Town Hall, in Regent Circus, Swindon, is home to a plaque commemorating Alfred's life and work.

Installed in 1933, the plaque includes a quotation from Alfred's friend, the Poet Laureate, Robert Bridges.

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