This poem was first published in Nature and Other Poems (1912), and was slightly amended before it was also included in Selected Poems (1925).
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Original version (1912):

         After the rain,
New joy and beauty bringing,
   How sweet! to wander forth again
Where the loud thrush, singing, singing,
   Pours forth his soul with still-increasing pain,
   In one full-hearted, loud, melodius strain,
         After the rain!

         After the rain,
In the still evening, when the shadows thicken,
   And silence falls again,
Where the warm winds quicken, quicken,
   With their sweet and odorous breath
   Every bud, and leaf and blossom,
   Drooping on the earth beneath,
While the soul to joy is fain,
Conquering every care and pain,
Let us wander forth again,
         After the rain!

         After the rain,
The hills show brighter, their green slopes,
   Washed with the essence, purer, clearer,
   Are lovelier, sweeter, plainer, nearer,
Life stirs within us, and our hopes
   Kindling in the heart and brain,
Forthwith a rosier colouring assume,
Earth is studded o'er with bloom,
   Young we grow, we know not how,
Banished every toil and pain,
   As we see the red sun dipping,
   O'er the meadows tripping, tripping,
         After the rain.

Amended version (1925):

         After the rain,
New joy and beauty bringing,
   How sweet! to wander forth again
Where the loud thrush, singing, singing,
   Pours forth his soul and soothes the weary brain,
   With one full-hearted, loud, melodius strain,
         After the rain!

         After the rain,
In the still evening, when the shadows thicken,
   And silence falls again,
Where the warm winds quicken, quicken,
   With their sweet and odorous breath
   Every bud, and leaf and blossom,
   Drooping on the earth beneath,
While the soul to joy is fain,
Conquering every care and pain,
Let us wander forth again,
         After the rain!

         After the rain,
The hills show brighter, their green slopes,
   Washed with the essence, purer, clearer,
   Are lovelier, sweeter, plainer, nearer;
Life stirs within us, and our hopes
   Kindling in the heart and brain,
Forthwith a rosier colouring assume,
Earth is studded o'er with bloom,
   Young we grow, we know not how,
Banished every toil and pain,
   As we see the red sun dipping,
   O'er the meadows tripping, tripping,
         After the rain.


Title photography by Richard Bradshaw

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